Events > Call Me Home.

A tribute to artists from all horizons who call San Francisco home. 

Opening: Friday November 30, 6pm-9pm
Exhibition: November 30, 2012 to January 23, 2013

Featuring Bay Area photographers, Kirk Crippens, Alan W George, Esmeralda Ruiz, Charity Vargas & Winni Wintermeyer.

In celebration of its one-year anniversary, Gallery Carte Blanche is pleased to announce the opening of their San Francisco-centric exhibition Call Me Home on Friday, November 30, 2012.  Featuring a series of photographs taken throughout San Francisco by 5 local photographers, Call Me Home is the exclamation mark after “Happy One-year Anniversary Carte Blanche!”

One year ago, on November 25th, Carte Blanche opened its Valencia Street doors. Since opening, numerous photography lovers and talented artists have become part of the gallery’s community. Hundreds of photographs and books have been exhibited on the gallery walls, shelves and tables, transforming the space into the home for photography it was conceived to be. Celebrating international visions and talents, Gallery Carte Blanche’s programming responds to the passion and commitment of photographers from around the world and from just around the corner.

After one year of multicultural discoveries and international inspiration provided through exhibitions, artists, talks and special programming, Gallery Carte Blanche is happy to celebrate year one with a bevy of local talent. Each of the 5 photographers represented in Call Me Home, like gallery owner Gwen Lafage, are non-native San Franciscans who have adopted this city and call it home. Notes gallery owner, Gwen Lafage, “An artistic inspiration for generations, San Francisco continually enchants and fascinates. The diversity and vibrancy of the City by the Bay make it a mysterious harbor, a place where life is quirky and accepting of people idiosyncrasies.” The photographs in Call Me Home capture these San Francisco wonders and engage with the landscape, exploring the city from the vantage points of its residential homes, foggy vistas and neon-lit alleys.

About the Photographers:

Kirk Crippens

Kirk Crippens had an early start with photography, inspired by his grandfather who kept a closet darkroom. As a college student Crippens ventured into photojournalism, interning at prestigious newspapers around the United States. Based in San Francisco since 2000, he has since focused his efforts on personal projects. In 2011 he was included in eighteen exhibitions, three of which were solo shows. Crippens was named one of the Top 50 Photographers in Critical Mass for the second consecutive year, nominated for Photolucida’s book prize, and exhibited in the International Photography Festival in Lishui, China. Currently the Artist-in-Residence at RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco, Crippens will begin a new residency in 2013 where he will be the Artist-in-Residence at Newspace Center for Photography in Portland, Oregon.

Alan W George

Alan W. George was born in Fayetteville, North Carolina on the first day of the last month of 1968. Alan first started exploring photography as a form of self-expression more or less eight years ago, serving as a survival tool for divorce, two children and getting old, among other things. George lives and plays in San Francisco, and in his precious spare time he can be found roaming the roads of Northern California, occasionally stopping to take a photograph.

Esmeralda Ruiz

Esmeralda Ruiz grew up in a small art studio in San Fernando Valley, CA with her two artist parents who exposed her to the wonders of all art forms at a young age. A key step in her way to becoming a photographer was when her father passed over his Hasselblad camera, and told her "A camera is a tool that you can use to capture the world around you. Just remember you are the voice behind the lens." These words still resonate with Ruiz as she uses and transforms the landscape that surrounds her to represent her dreams, and to make visual references to a time in her childhood when she flat-lined for three minutes. Thriving on adventure, most of Ruiz’s images are made while she travels, especially down the California coastline. Her images create a vast, peaceful space that is universal to all viewers and allows the mind to wander.

Charity Vargas

Raised on an Air Force base near Canada, in the foothills of Sierra Nevada Mountains surrounded by old cedars and snow, and still later in the suburbs - surrounded by little, Charity Vargas now lives in one of the San Francisco Presidio’s historic houses. The majority of her work has been photographing in the Presidio, a former Army base transformed into Americas’ largest urban national park. The forests and military industrial architecture here do not seem at odds to her, where nature thrives alongside structures modified over many years, for many uses. Since 2003 Vargas has photographed the Presidio and its changes, noting that its complex landscape feels familiar to her.

Winni Wintermeyer

Born in the industrial Ruhr Valley in Bochum, Germany, Winni Wintermeyer moved to San Francisco in the early 1990s, settling in a neighborhood where mockingbirds imitate the sounds of cheap car alarms. Working as an editorial photographer he creates images of people for various publications around the globe. In his free time Wintermeyer likes to observe and document humans and the traces they leave behind, taking those images and rearranging them to tell new stories. You can find his work at Hespe Gallery and the SFMOMA Artists Gallery.

 


Esmeralda Ruiz


Charity Vargas


Alan W. George


Kirk Crippens


Winni Wintermeyer